Posts Tagged ‘precision nutrition’

I’ll keep it short and sweet for the reads of the week.  Part of the reason for my brevity is that I don’t have any bad government jokes to deliver.  The other reason is that Chad and I are busy working on a mini-project that we’re pretty excited about and want to deliver to you as quickly as possible.

Our Weekly Rundown

 

Cockiness and personal bias aside, we write good stuff here at Show Me Strength.  Here is a list of the articles from this past week in case you missed them.

Why I Failed: Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen

In part 1 of the series, “Why I failed,” Travis Smith offers valuable insight into a problem so many young and experienced athletes fall into: program ADD.  You’re always looking for the very best next program instead of focusing on dominating the one you already have.

Hacking Your Offseason Volume 3: Supplement Guide for Dummies

To put it bluntly, the value of supplements is largely overrated in maximizing your training.  Most don’t work and the majority of individuals’ sole focus is on what supplements they need before making sure their nutrition and recovery is adequate.  Chad gives you the bare bones essentials you need to succeed and questions to ask yourself before you go breaking bank on the latest testosterone booster from China.

Breaking the Cycle of Mediocrity

Mediocrity consumes our lives.  Break the cycle today.  Create your legacy.

The Interwebz Reads of the Week:

 

Pitching Performance: Understanding Trunk Position at Foot Strike Part 12, and 3 by Eric Cressey and Matt Blake

Pitching is the fastest motion in all of sports with the angular velocity of the shoulder rotating upwards of 7200 degrees per second.  There a lot of pieces that are required to make this explosive transfer of energy as biomechanically efficient and explosive as possible.  In this article, Eric and Matt do an excellent job of dissecting the delivery from all ends of the spectrum including a great discussion of the interplay between functional anatomy, core stability, and how they interact to produce the different deliveries of pitchers. In parts 2 and 3, they offer a list of drills and progressions to maximize mobility and biomechanics to aid in creating the most efficient delivery possible.

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Boosting Recovery: Solutions to the Most Common Recovery Problems by Kurtis Frank

There are so many articles across the interwebz (thank you, John Romaniello) that are solely dedicated to training.  What exercises do I do to get bigger pecs?  How can I increase my squat max?  All these are well and good but they’re irrelevant unless we nail the other half of the equation… optimizing recovery.

Kurtis Frank of Examine.com, an impressive website dedicated to tackling the world of research involved in supplements and nutrition, does an excellent job thoroughly dissecting all the information you need to optimize your recovery.  From nutrition hacks to utilizing supplements that reduce stress, everyone stands to benefit from this article.

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Is School the Easy Way Out by Jonathan Goodman:

Is school your safety net?  Is it protecting you from the uncertainties of the real world?  Is it the place you run to when you’re afraid to take a risk and chase your passion?  Jon offers an interesting perspective to all these questions in the hope that you will use his deconstruction to ask the bigger question which is what do you really want out of life?

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A bit belated, but we have been spending time synthesizing some the great ideas that came from @showmestrength‘s attendance of the 1st Annual Fall Seminar at Cressey Performance.  We are now excited to share Part 1 of it with the Show-Me Strength community!

The packed-house day (although Hurricane Sandy promted early evacuations, not caused by Tony’s jokes) consisted of 7 tremendous talks from CP strength coaches Eric Cressey, Tony Gentilcore, Chris Howard, and Greg Robins, nutritionist Brian St. Pierre, as well as associated physical therpist Eric Schoenberg and chiropractor Nate Tiplady.

20121130-130224.jpgWhile the entire scope of the event would be too lengthy to cover fully, the hope is to highlight the overall message of the event, as well as the top lessons learned from the talks in order of presentation.

A common theme of the talks can be summarized by the quote recently offered in our last post:

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results” -Albert Einstein

Many emphasized the necessity of re-thinking previous methodologies, re-considering others, and keeping an open mind to new treatment and strengthening protocols. Along these lines, each of the presenters
made it very clear the need for integration, recognition, and cooperation amongst the various areas of expertise- strength, nutrition, physical and manual therapy, and medicine- in order to effect the greatest benefit to athletes. At facilities like Cressey Performance, the results acchieved speak volumes to the power of such interactions between fields of expertise.

Eric Cressey, MA, CSCS- Understanding and Managing Congenital Laxity

CP Strong

As commander-in-chief of Cressey Performance, Eric spoke of his experience training elite professional, college and high school baseball players as well as other clients.  Drawing from his ample client base, he spoke of “tightness” and how that presents especially in the baseball population.  “Tightness” presents for a variety of reasons- muscular shortness, protective tension, neural tension, previous injury, soft tissue restrictions, protective spasms, or issues with inadequate stiffness at adjacent joints- just to name a few.  Lots to consider when evaluating clients!  Here are some knowledge bomb highlights:

Recognizing the intricate interaction between stiffness and flexibility and it’s role in determining mobility
-NEED to assses each athlete individually
-some athletes might appear to be “stiff” but really just lack the ability to create the necessary stability within their range of motion in order to utilize their full physical range of motion

How to effectively use “stretching”
-important not to overdo stretching
-rarely does one need static stretching
-use static and dynamic stretching to “get long” but very important to lock that in with strength training

Brian St. Pierre, CSCS, CISSN- The Food Freakshow: What will you be eating into the 21st Century?

As a certified Precision Nutritionist, former CP strength coach, and one of the most inquisitive minds when it comes to sifting through current research and trends in nutrition, Brian spoke of concerns with the future of food, as well as some great general PN based guidelines to consider when advising clients.  Before you discount what he has to say below because of the picture, don’t worry, he didn’t suggest feeding them insects, just yet!

Interesting and controversial methods of food enrichment- Yum!
-algae farms for nutrition
-adding flu fighting nanotechnologies to milk
-genetically modified organisms (GMO’s)
-stem cell beef –> not too far off in the future!
-other meat substitutes “mini-livestock” a.k.a insects
-high in protein, iron and calcium
-as population grows exponentially, we may one day resort to cultivation of insects as a source of nutrients (who wouldn’t want a insect protein shake?!?)

PN guidelines to follow
-focus on lean proteins, vegetables
-be reasonable when it comes to starches and fruits, and healthy fats
-focus on WHOLE foods!
-LOW or no calorie beverages- ditch the sugar sports drinks!

Nate Tiplady, D.C.- Manual Therapy: What we know, what we don’t know and the most effective ways to get people better

Nate, utilizing his varied background  presented a great overview of many manual therapy techniques which we have found as professional baseball players help tremendously in maintaining proper range of motion, and to help clear up mobility issues which may get in our way.  Both Chad and I have utilized Nate’s expertise for arm maintenance and it is worth exploring some of these options, as outlined below, to see if they may be of use in your training plans.

from Loghmani, MT et al. Instrument-Assisted Cross-Fiber Massages Accelerates Knee Ligament Healing; J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2009; 39(7); 506-514.

from Loghmani, MT et al. Instrument-Assisted Cross-Fiber Massages Accelerates Knee Ligament Healing; J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2009; 39(7); 506-514.

Fascial Manipulation
-utilizing treatment (applying pressure) to the connective tissue which creates a continues matrix of structural support surrounding the body

Active Release Therapy
-soft tissue/movement based massage technique
-utilizes specifically directed tension with movement patterns

Graston Technique
-patented treatment method using stainless steel instruments
-mechanical load on tissues has been shown to increase healing of tissue
(see study right which shows a comparison between MCL ligament healing with Graston (C) versus without (B) compared to a healthy ligament)

Joint Manipulation
-application of high velocity low amplitude thrust to the vertebrae or extermity joint
-goal is to restore restricted range of motion and influence surrounding structures
-not something that can be learned in a book or weekend course, so it is important to develop networks of expert professionals for clients

Finally, Nate mentioned a tremendous video about the “Healing Power of Touch” which is unfortunately a dying area.  Definitley worth a watch:

Check back for Part 2, where four more great talks will be highlighted:

Eric Schoenberg, MSPT, CSCS- Out with the Old: A new model for preventing injury and improving performance in the throwing athlete

Chris Howard, MS, NSCA-CPT, CSCS- Program Design Considerations for the Young Athlete

Greg Robins, NASM-CPT, RKC, CSCS- How Strong Does An Athlete Need To Be?

And last but certainly not least,

Tony Gentilcore, CSCS, CPT- Deep Squats: Are They Worth It?

One of my most favorite quoted athletes of all time, Yogi Berra, once said, “Baseball is 90% mental, the other half is physical.”  Granted his math doesn’t quite add up, but there is a subtle sense in his madness.  I’d like to adapt this favorite quote of mine to training and say that “Fitness is 90% nutrition, the other half is physical.”  Here’s why:

Nutrition is one of the most important, arguably the most important part of any proper training program.  You can train hard and train smart, but if you are not supplying (more…)